New Google Glass Launched But It’s Not For You


Google hyped up the benefits of Google Glass quite a bit back when this product was launched as part of an Explorer Program a couple of years ago. However, Google’s ambitions for putting a wearable computer on our faces fizzled out. It didn’t release another version of the Google Glass and we’ve not heard much about this product over the past two years. However, a new Google Glass has been launched today, but don’t get too excited because it’s not for you.

Google started focusing on the applications for this technology in the enterprise market. For the past two years, it has been working to make Glass more useful in several industries.

The new Google Glass Enterprise Edition that it has launched today makes what the company has been working on for the last couple of years widely available to enterprise customers.

Throughout this time, Google has worked with select partners to make Glass more useful in their factories and on their production lines. GE Aviation is one of the partners that Google has been working with.

Its mechanics are sporting Google Glass which displays important instructions while they carry out airplane assembly and maintenance. Glass frees their hands and GE Aviation estimates that this has improved efficiency on the floor by as much as 12 percent.

The new Google Glass obviously won’t be making its way to customers but, nevertheless, it’s nice to see that Google has finally found a place for this product.

New Google Glass Launched But It’s Not For You , original content from Ubergizmo. Read our Copyrights and terms of use.

More...

First Google Glass Update Released After Almost Three Years


Google got everyone excited about the smart wearable glasses concept with the Google Glass. It sold the device for $1,500 but it was clear that the first-generation product wasn’t meant for the average consumers. Google hasn’t really talked about releasing such a product for the average consumer since then but it’s still supporting the units it sold. The first Google Glass firmware update has arrive after nearly three years.

This is the first Google Glass update since September 2017. The MyGlass companion app for Google Glass has received an update which brings support for Bluetooth aside from bug fixes.

The update will enable the XE23 version of Google Glass to work with Bluetooth keyboards, mice, and other devices. The app update was released yesterday while Google released the firmware update for the Glass wearable itself today.

Google seems to be willing to support Google Glass even though it’s no longer selling the device and even shut down the Glass website back in 2015. It was actually a Google X project and once it graduated from the company’s experimental labs, it was repositioned as more of an enterprise product. This is why there hasn’t been much talk about a consumer version of Glass so far.

Whether or not the company decides to make one in the future is another matter entirely, but it hasn’t hinted anything about that as yet.

First Google Glass Update Released After Almost Three Years , original content from Ubergizmo. Read our Copyrights and terms of use.

More...

Google I/O 2017: What to Expect

Google I/O 2016

So far every year for the past few years without fail Google has hosted its annual Google I/O event, and this year the company is back with the 2017 version. Just like Microsoft’s BUILD conferences or Apple’s WWDC, Google I/O is mostly about software and services, where Google will introduce new software and potentially launch new services for its customers to check out, and we expect that this year will be no different. So below is a list of everything that you might be able to expect from the event which will be taking place from the 17th-19th of May, 2017.

Android O

Right off the bat we guess the biggest and most obvious thing we can expect Google to talk about at Google I/O would be Android O. This is Google’s latest update on its Android operating system and as it stands, a version number and its name (apart from the designated “O”) has yet to be revealed.

A handful of features of Android O have trickled out ever since its developer preview was released, but we expect a more formal introduction at the event.

Android Auto

Android Auto is Google’s attempt at trying to bring a version of Android into cars and its infotainment systems. We’ve seen Google introduce various new features and updates to the platform, such as integrating Waze in Android Auto, so perhaps we’ll learn more about the future of the platform at the event.

Android Wear

This topic is a little tricky. Android Wear 2.0 was announced last year at Google I/O 2016, but due to several delays, the update was only just released to Android Wear smartwatches a couple of months ago. With the update being this fresh in everyone’s mind, we’re not sure if Google will even touch on Android Wear 3.0 so soon.

Chrome OS

One of the bigger changes that Google has done to its Chrome OS platform is giving it the ability to run Android apps. There have been talks about Google possibly merging Chrome OS and Android into a unified platform, but that has since been denied, with Google’s Hiroshi Lockheimer stating that both platforms are successful in their own regard and that merging them together doesn’t make sense. Earlier this year Google also hinted at the possibility that Chrome OS could be arriving in other form factors so maybe at I/O we’ll be able to get a taste of what’s to come.

Google Home

Google Home was launched last year and we expect that Google is probably working on a successor. Following Amazon’s launch of smaller and more compact Echo speakers, and also the Echo Show which comes with a touchscreen display, we wouldn’t be surprised if Google had a newer, smaller, and maybe touch-sensitive version of Home in the works as well.

Google Assistant

While voice assistants have existed on Android for the longest time ever, the launch of Google Assistant and seeing it integrated into various Google apps and services suggests that Google has bigger plans for the platform. Right now Google Assistant has made its way out of the Pixel phones and onto non-Pixel handsets, so we expect that Google will share more plans for the future of the software.

Virtual Reality/Daydream

Google’s interest in virtual reality and augmented reality aren’t new. Last year when the Pixel handsets launched, they were Google’s first Daydream-ready handsets and we wouldn’t be surprised if Google were to announce more partners that would be launching Daydream-ready devices. Let’s not forget Google’s recent acquisition of VR developers Owlchemy Labs, where hopefully the company will share some of their plans with what they plan to do with the acquisition in terms of hardware or software.

Augmented Reality

The Google Glass is Google’s answer to augmented reality and while the project was previously scrapped and rebooted, we haven’t really heard much about it since. Could Google have something to show us this year? Although with Google shutting down Glass-related social media accounts, it certainly doesn’t seem that way, but we’ll keep our fingers crossed.

Project Tango

Google unveiled Project Tango a couple of years ago, although it was only last year that a phone with the actual technology was launched in the form of the Lenovo Phab 2 Pro. Following that we saw ASUS launch a similar handset in the form of the ASUS ZenFone AR, and last we heard a new Lenovo Project Tango phone could also be in the works for 2017 which could be shown off at I/O 2017.

Self-driving Cars

While Google’s self-driving car efforts have been spun-off into a separate company in the form of Waymo, it is possible that Google could share what they’ve learnt so far from their efforts, maybe share some statistics and what the plans are moving forward, or maybe they’ll even give I/O attendees a demonstration of the self-driving cars in action.

So this is what we think you could expect from Google I/O 2017. Some of them are pretty much a given, like Android O, but some are based on what we’ve seen Google talk about in the past, as well as some speculation and even hope of what to expect. This means that there is no guarantee that what is mentioned here will be announced at the event, but either way we will be covering the event so remember to check back with us from the 17th-19th of May for the details.

Google I/O 2017: What to Expect , original content from Ubergizmo. Read our Copyrights and terms of use.

More...

Google I/O 2017: What to Expect

Google I/O 2016

So far every year for the past few years without fail Google has hosted its annual Google I/O event, and this year the company is back with the 2017 version. Just like Microsoft’s BUILD conferences or Apple’s WWDC, Google I/O is mostly about software and services, where Google will introduce new software and potentially launch new services for its customers to check out, and we expect that this year will be no different. So below is a list of everything that you might be able to expect from the event which will be taking place from the 17th-19th of May, 2017.

Android O

Right off the bat we guess the biggest and most obvious thing we can expect Google to talk about at Google I/O would be Android O. This is Google’s latest update on its Android operating system and as it stands, a version number and its name (apart from the designated “O”) has yet to be revealed.

A handful of features of Android O have trickled out ever since its developer preview was released, but we expect a more formal introduction at the event.

Android Auto

Android Auto is Google’s attempt at trying to bring a version of Android into cars and its infotainment systems. We’ve seen Google introduce various new features and updates to the platform, such as integrating Waze in Android Auto, so perhaps we’ll learn more about the future of the platform at the event.

Android Wear

This topic is a little tricky. Android Wear 2.0 was announced last year at Google I/O 2016, but due to several delays, the update was only just released to Android Wear smartwatches a couple of months ago. With the update being this fresh in everyone’s mind, we’re not sure if Google will even touch on Android Wear 3.0 so soon.

Chrome OS

One of the bigger changes that Google has done to its Chrome OS platform is giving it the ability to run Android apps. There have been talks about Google possibly merging Chrome OS and Android into a unified platform, but that has since been denied, with Google’s Hiroshi Lockheimer stating that both platforms are successful in their own regard and that merging them together doesn’t make sense. Earlier this year Google also hinted at the possibility that Chrome OS could be arriving in other form factors so maybe at I/O we’ll be able to get a taste of what’s to come.

Google Home

Google Home was launched last year and we expect that Google is probably working on a successor. Following Amazon’s launch of smaller and more compact Echo speakers, and also the Echo Show which comes with a touchscreen display, we wouldn’t be surprised if Google had a newer, smaller, and maybe touch-sensitive version of Home in the works as well.

Google Assistant

While voice assistants have existed on Android for the longest time ever, the launch of Google Assistant and seeing it integrated into various Google apps and services suggests that Google has bigger plans for the platform. Right now Google Assistant has made its way out of the Pixel phones and onto non-Pixel handsets, so we expect that Google will share more plans for the future of the software.

Virtual Reality/Daydream

Google’s interest in virtual reality and augmented reality aren’t new. Last year when the Pixel handsets launched, they were Google’s first Daydream-ready handsets and we wouldn’t be surprised if Google were to announce more partners that would be launching Daydream-ready devices. Let’s not forget Google’s recent acquisition of VR developers Owlchemy Labs, where hopefully the company will share some of their plans with what they plan to do with the acquisition in terms of hardware or software.

Augmented Reality

The Google Glass is Google’s answer to augmented reality and while the project was previously scrapped and rebooted, we haven’t really heard much about it since. Could Google have something to show us this year? Although with Google shutting down Glass-related social media accounts, it certainly doesn’t seem that way, but we’ll keep our fingers crossed.

Project Tango

Google unveiled Project Tango a couple of years ago, although it was only last year that a phone with the actual technology was launched in the form of the Lenovo Phab 2 Pro. Following that we saw ASUS launch a similar handset in the form of the ASUS ZenFone AR, and last we heard a new Lenovo Project Tango phone could also be in the works for 2017 which could be shown off at I/O 2017.

Self-driving Cars

While Google’s self-driving car efforts have been spun-off into a separate company in the form of Waymo, it is possible that Google could share what they’ve learnt so far from their efforts, maybe share some statistics and what the plans are moving forward, or maybe they’ll even give I/O attendees a demonstration of the self-driving cars in action.

So this is what we think you could expect from Google I/O 2017. Some of them are pretty much a given, like Android O, but some are based on what we’ve seen Google talk about in the past, as well as some speculation and even hope of what to expect. This means that there is no guarantee that what is mentioned here will be announced at the event, but either way we will be covering the event so remember to check back with us from the 17th-19th of May for the details.

Google I/O 2017: What to Expect , original content from Ubergizmo. Read our Copyrights and terms of use.

More...