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Category Archives: Daydream

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Google Experimenting With New Ad Formats For Virtual Reality

Tyler Lee June 28, 2017

For the most part, a lot of Google’s services and products are free to use which probably explains how they’ve managed to amass so many customers over the years. Granted there are some paid Google services, but unless you’re an enterprise user or a power user, most of the time you can get away with using Google’s free options.

Of course the saying “there’s no such thing as a free lunch” rings pretty true as Google makes money through ads, and it seems that if you’re hoping that maybe virtual reality (VR) will be ad-free, sorry to say but that doesn’t look like it as Google has announced at the company is experimenting with new ad formats designed for VR over at their Area 120 incubator.

One of the examples they’ve come up with comes in the form of a cube that sits at the bottom of an app, and clicking on it or gazing on it for a few seconds will cause it to spring up and expand. “Developers and users have told us they want to avoid disruptive, hard-to-implement ad experiences in VR. So our first idea for a potential format presents a cube to users, with the option to engage with it and then see a video ad. By tapping on the cube or gazing at it for a few seconds, the cube opens a video player where the user can watch, and then easily close, the video.”

This is presumably just one of the ideas Google is experimenting with now, and to be fair we guess it isn’t a bad one as it isn’t particularly disruptive, and users have the choice of interacting with it. Whether or not this is something that gets implemented remains to be seen, but what do you guys think?

Google Experimenting With New Ad Formats For Virtual Reality , original content from Ubergizmo. Read our Copyrights and terms of use.

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Google’s Daydream Elements Highlights Best VR Practices

Tyler Lee May 19, 2017

With virtual reality (VR) technology being relatively new and slowly gaining momentum, we guess there is still quite a lot of things that developers have yet to figure out, such as what is the best way to design an app for VR and how can it deliver the best experience? The good news for developers is that Google is here to help.

The company has recently released an app called Daydream Elements. This app is clearly designed for developers in mind and it basically highlights the best VR practices that developers can adopt when creating content. “Daydream Elements is a collection of tech demos that showcase principles and best practices for developing high-quality VR experiences. The core mechanics in each demo are built to be easily configurable and reusable for your own applications.”

As you can see in the screenshot above, the app will discuss various topics related to VR and how to best approach them. This includes movement within the virtual world, designing the menus and virtual controls that can be used, along with rendering and lighting. Given that motion sickness is a potential problem when donning VR headsets, we reckon that these guidelines might be important especially for newbie developers getting into the VR game.

If you’re interested in checking it out, then head on over to the Google Play Store for the download, but note that you will need a Daydream compatible handset and a headset viewer to really take advantage of the app.

Google’s Daydream Elements Highlights Best VR Practices , original content from Ubergizmo. Read our Copyrights and terms of use.

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HTC And Lenovo Working On Google’s Standalone VR Headsets

Adnan Farooqui May 17, 2017


It has long been rumored that Google might come out with its own standalone virtual reality headset. A standalone VR headset doesn’t require a smartphone to function. All of the components that it needs to function are integrated within the headset itself. At I/O 2017 today, Google confirmed that it’s working with HTC and Lenovo on standalone VR headsets.

These headsets will have support for a new tracking technology called WorldSense. It provides positional tracking which means that the headset will be capable of tracking the user’s precise movements in space. It does this without requiring any external sensors.

Google has worked with Qualcomm to create a standalone headset reference design that partners like HTC and Lenovo can use as a blueprint to build their own headsets on. Both manufacturers are working on similar devices which will be the first ones to come out later this year.

The company only shared a sketch of the standalone VR headset at I/O 2017 today. It appears to be accompanied by a controller similar to what we get with the Daydream View headset. No confirmed release date has been provided as yet by Google.

When the headsets do arrive, they will require no smartphone or PC to function. Everything needed to power a virtual reality experience will be integrated into the headset itself. More details about these headsets will be revealed in the coming months.

HTC And Lenovo Working On Google’s Standalone VR Headsets , original content from Ubergizmo. Read our Copyrights and terms of use.

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Google To Launch Dedicated VR Headset At I/O 2017

Tyler Lee May 16, 2017

Google’s interest in virtual reality (VR) is pretty well-known, what with the launch of the Google Cardboard headset and the Daydream platform. In fact last year it was rumored that Google could be throwing their hat into the ring with a dedicated VR headset similar to that of the HTC Vive, Oculus Rift, and the Sony PlayStation VR.

However after several months of rumors, it was then suggested that Google might have given up their plans, or did they? According to an exclusive report from Variety, they claim to have heard from multiple sources that the project isn’t quite as dead as we had been previously led to think. In fact it seems that the project has been coming along rather nicely and that Google could very well unveil a dedicated VR headset at Google I/O 2017 which will be kicking off this week from the 17-19th of May.

What makes this headset different from Cardboard or the Daydream View is that it will not require the use of a smartphone to power it. This means that it should be able to reach a wide audience who might not necessarily own a smartphone that is Daydream ready or compatible with Cardboard.

However the report notes that it is unclear as to what software will be used to power this headset, whether it be Android or maybe something completely new of Google’s own making, but until we hear it from Google officially, take it with a grain of salt for now.

Google To Launch Dedicated VR Headset At I/O 2017 , original content from Ubergizmo. Read our Copyrights and terms of use.

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Google I/O 2017: What to Expect

Tyler Lee May 12, 2017

Google I/O 2016

So far every year for the past few years without fail Google has hosted its annual Google I/O event, and this year the company is back with the 2017 version. Just like Microsoft’s BUILD conferences or Apple’s WWDC, Google I/O is mostly about software and services, where Google will introduce new software and potentially launch new services for its customers to check out, and we expect that this year will be no different. So below is a list of everything that you might be able to expect from the event which will be taking place from the 17th-19th of May, 2017.

Android O

Right off the bat we guess the biggest and most obvious thing we can expect Google to talk about at Google I/O would be Android O. This is Google’s latest update on its Android operating system and as it stands, a version number and its name (apart from the designated “O”) has yet to be revealed.

A handful of features of Android O have trickled out ever since its developer preview was released, but we expect a more formal introduction at the event.

Android Auto

Android Auto is Google’s attempt at trying to bring a version of Android into cars and its infotainment systems. We’ve seen Google introduce various new features and updates to the platform, such as integrating Waze in Android Auto, so perhaps we’ll learn more about the future of the platform at the event.

Android Wear

This topic is a little tricky. Android Wear 2.0 was announced last year at Google I/O 2016, but due to several delays, the update was only just released to Android Wear smartwatches a couple of months ago. With the update being this fresh in everyone’s mind, we’re not sure if Google will even touch on Android Wear 3.0 so soon.

Chrome OS

One of the bigger changes that Google has done to its Chrome OS platform is giving it the ability to run Android apps. There have been talks about Google possibly merging Chrome OS and Android into a unified platform, but that has since been denied, with Google’s Hiroshi Lockheimer stating that both platforms are successful in their own regard and that merging them together doesn’t make sense. Earlier this year Google also hinted at the possibility that Chrome OS could be arriving in other form factors so maybe at I/O we’ll be able to get a taste of what’s to come.

Google Home

Google Home was launched last year and we expect that Google is probably working on a successor. Following Amazon’s launch of smaller and more compact Echo speakers, and also the Echo Show which comes with a touchscreen display, we wouldn’t be surprised if Google had a newer, smaller, and maybe touch-sensitive version of Home in the works as well.

Google Assistant

While voice assistants have existed on Android for the longest time ever, the launch of Google Assistant and seeing it integrated into various Google apps and services suggests that Google has bigger plans for the platform. Right now Google Assistant has made its way out of the Pixel phones and onto non-Pixel handsets, so we expect that Google will share more plans for the future of the software.

Virtual Reality/Daydream

Google’s interest in virtual reality and augmented reality aren’t new. Last year when the Pixel handsets launched, they were Google’s first Daydream-ready handsets and we wouldn’t be surprised if Google were to announce more partners that would be launching Daydream-ready devices. Let’s not forget Google’s recent acquisition of VR developers Owlchemy Labs, where hopefully the company will share some of their plans with what they plan to do with the acquisition in terms of hardware or software.

Augmented Reality

The Google Glass is Google’s answer to augmented reality and while the project was previously scrapped and rebooted, we haven’t really heard much about it since. Could Google have something to show us this year? Although with Google shutting down Glass-related social media accounts, it certainly doesn’t seem that way, but we’ll keep our fingers crossed.

Project Tango

Google unveiled Project Tango a couple of years ago, although it was only last year that a phone with the actual technology was launched in the form of the Lenovo Phab 2 Pro. Following that we saw ASUS launch a similar handset in the form of the ASUS ZenFone AR, and last we heard a new Lenovo Project Tango phone could also be in the works for 2017 which could be shown off at I/O 2017.

Self-driving Cars

While Google’s self-driving car efforts have been spun-off into a separate company in the form of Waymo, it is possible that Google could share what they’ve learnt so far from their efforts, maybe share some statistics and what the plans are moving forward, or maybe they’ll even give I/O attendees a demonstration of the self-driving cars in action.

So this is what we think you could expect from Google I/O 2017. Some of them are pretty much a given, like Android O, but some are based on what we’ve seen Google talk about in the past, as well as some speculation and even hope of what to expect. This means that there is no guarantee that what is mentioned here will be announced at the event, but either way we will be covering the event so remember to check back with us from the 17th-19th of May for the details.

Google I/O 2017: What to Expect , original content from Ubergizmo. Read our Copyrights and terms of use.

0

Google I/O 2017: What to Expect

Tyler Lee May 12, 2017

Google I/O 2016

So far every year for the past few years without fail Google has hosted its annual Google I/O event, and this year the company is back with the 2017 version. Just like Microsoft’s BUILD conferences or Apple’s WWDC, Google I/O is mostly about software and services, where Google will introduce new software and potentially launch new services for its customers to check out, and we expect that this year will be no different. So below is a list of everything that you might be able to expect from the event which will be taking place from the 17th-19th of May, 2017.

Android O

Right off the bat we guess the biggest and most obvious thing we can expect Google to talk about at Google I/O would be Android O. This is Google’s latest update on its Android operating system and as it stands, a version number and its name (apart from the designated “O”) has yet to be revealed.

A handful of features of Android O have trickled out ever since its developer preview was released, but we expect a more formal introduction at the event.

Android Auto

Android Auto is Google’s attempt at trying to bring a version of Android into cars and its infotainment systems. We’ve seen Google introduce various new features and updates to the platform, such as integrating Waze in Android Auto, so perhaps we’ll learn more about the future of the platform at the event.

Android Wear

This topic is a little tricky. Android Wear 2.0 was announced last year at Google I/O 2016, but due to several delays, the update was only just released to Android Wear smartwatches a couple of months ago. With the update being this fresh in everyone’s mind, we’re not sure if Google will even touch on Android Wear 3.0 so soon.

Chrome OS

One of the bigger changes that Google has done to its Chrome OS platform is giving it the ability to run Android apps. There have been talks about Google possibly merging Chrome OS and Android into a unified platform, but that has since been denied, with Google’s Hiroshi Lockheimer stating that both platforms are successful in their own regard and that merging them together doesn’t make sense. Earlier this year Google also hinted at the possibility that Chrome OS could be arriving in other form factors so maybe at I/O we’ll be able to get a taste of what’s to come.

Google Home

Google Home was launched last year and we expect that Google is probably working on a successor. Following Amazon’s launch of smaller and more compact Echo speakers, and also the Echo Show which comes with a touchscreen display, we wouldn’t be surprised if Google had a newer, smaller, and maybe touch-sensitive version of Home in the works as well.

Google Assistant

While voice assistants have existed on Android for the longest time ever, the launch of Google Assistant and seeing it integrated into various Google apps and services suggests that Google has bigger plans for the platform. Right now Google Assistant has made its way out of the Pixel phones and onto non-Pixel handsets, so we expect that Google will share more plans for the future of the software.

Virtual Reality/Daydream

Google’s interest in virtual reality and augmented reality aren’t new. Last year when the Pixel handsets launched, they were Google’s first Daydream-ready handsets and we wouldn’t be surprised if Google were to announce more partners that would be launching Daydream-ready devices. Let’s not forget Google’s recent acquisition of VR developers Owlchemy Labs, where hopefully the company will share some of their plans with what they plan to do with the acquisition in terms of hardware or software.

Augmented Reality

The Google Glass is Google’s answer to augmented reality and while the project was previously scrapped and rebooted, we haven’t really heard much about it since. Could Google have something to show us this year? Although with Google shutting down Glass-related social media accounts, it certainly doesn’t seem that way, but we’ll keep our fingers crossed.

Project Tango

Google unveiled Project Tango a couple of years ago, although it was only last year that a phone with the actual technology was launched in the form of the Lenovo Phab 2 Pro. Following that we saw ASUS launch a similar handset in the form of the ASUS ZenFone AR, and last we heard a new Lenovo Project Tango phone could also be in the works for 2017 which could be shown off at I/O 2017.

Self-driving Cars

While Google’s self-driving car efforts have been spun-off into a separate company in the form of Waymo, it is possible that Google could share what they’ve learnt so far from their efforts, maybe share some statistics and what the plans are moving forward, or maybe they’ll even give I/O attendees a demonstration of the self-driving cars in action.

So this is what we think you could expect from Google I/O 2017. Some of them are pretty much a given, like Android O, but some are based on what we’ve seen Google talk about in the past, as well as some speculation and even hope of what to expect. This means that there is no guarantee that what is mentioned here will be announced at the event, but either way we will be covering the event so remember to check back with us from the 17th-19th of May for the details.

Google I/O 2017: What to Expect , original content from Ubergizmo. Read our Copyrights and terms of use.

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Galaxy S8/S8+ Are Not Daydream Compatible (For Now)

Tyler Lee April 1, 2017

When Samsung launched its new Galaxy S8 and S8+ handsets, it was unsurprisingly compatible with the company’s 2017 Gear VR and Controller devices. However given that it is an Android phone, we’re sure some of you guys might be wondering whether or not it is compatible with Google’s Daydream VR platform.

The bad news is that it isn’t, at least that’s according to a report from the folks at VRHeads. Trying to install the Daydream app on the phone will result in a message that reads, “a compatible version is missing”. However there is some good news is that if you don’t mind rooting your phone and adding a single line of code to your system permission files, you will be able to get it up and running with Daydream.

It is unclear why the handsets aren’t Daydream compatible considering that its specs certainly do meet the requirements and more. However it has been speculated that maybe Samsung’s partnership with Oculus could be the reason why Daydream support isn’t available for now. We’re not sure if that will ever change, so maybe don’t hold your breath.

However like we said, all it takes is a slight tweak to your system’s permission files and that problem goes away, that is if only you’re comfortable with rooting your phone and making these changes. If you don’t have an issue with that, then check out VRHead’s guide on how to do it, but proceed at your own risk!

Galaxy S8/S8+ Are Not Daydream Compatible (For Now) , original content from Ubergizmo. Read our Copyrights and terms of use.

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Galaxy S8/S8+ Are Not Daydream Compatible (For Now)

Tyler Lee April 1, 2017

When Samsung launched its new Galaxy S8 and S8+ handsets, it was unsurprisingly compatible with the company’s 2017 Gear VR and Controller devices. However given that it is an Android phone, we’re sure some of you guys might be wondering whether or not it is compatible with Google’s Daydream VR platform.

The bad news is that it isn’t, at least that’s according to a report from the folks at VRHeads. Trying to install the Daydream app on the phone will result in a message that reads, “a compatible version is missing”. However there is some good news is that if you don’t mind rooting your phone and adding a single line of code to your system permission files, you will be able to get it up and running with Daydream.

It is unclear why the handsets aren’t Daydream compatible considering that its specs certainly do meet the requirements and more. However it has been speculated that maybe Samsung’s partnership with Oculus could be the reason why Daydream support isn’t available for now. We’re not sure if that will ever change, so maybe don’t hold your breath.

However like we said, all it takes is a slight tweak to your system’s permission files and that problem goes away, that is if only you’re comfortable with rooting your phone and making these changes. If you don’t have an issue with that, then check out VRHead’s guide on how to do it, but proceed at your own risk!

Galaxy S8/S8+ Are Not Daydream Compatible (For Now) , original content from Ubergizmo. Read our Copyrights and terms of use.

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Google Opens Daydream App Development To All

Tyler Lee January 26, 2017

google-daydream-viewer-3The thing with new platforms is that you need to populate it with fun apps and establish a good ecosystem if you hope to attract more users and more developers, especially since it can be a vicious cycle where users don’t want to adopt it due to the lack of apps, and developers don’t want to create for it due to a lack of users, and so on.

Prior to this, Google’s Daydream VR platform was a bit limited as Google only allowed certain developers to create apps for it. However the good news is that it looks like they have decided to open it up to everyone else. This means that if you’re a budding developer looking to get in on the VR craze through Daydream, you’ll now be able to.

Google has put together a website in which it tells users how to go about creating apps for the platform. According to Google, “Opting-in to Daydream distribution means that you want your app to be made discoverable to Daydream users through Google Play VR and Daydream Home. Upon publication, Google Play submits apps that are opted-in to Daydream for review against the Daydream App Quality criteria and notifies you of the result. If your app meets all criteria, Google Play makes it discoverable to Daydream users in VR.”

For the end user this might not be that big of a deal, but as a developer it means you’ll now be able to get started to create apps for the platform, which we guess in turn will benefit users.

Google Opens Daydream App Development To All , original content from Ubergizmo. Read our Copyrights and terms of use.

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Google Daydream View VR Headset Gets First Price Cut

Adnan Farooqui January 17, 2017

daydream-vr-new-colors
Google introduced its Daydream virtual reality platform last year. The platform was released just a few months ago after the company released its Daydream VR-compatible Pixel smartphones. It also released its very own Daydream View virtual reality headset that costs $79. The Daydream View VR headset has now received its very first price cut for a limited time.

If you’re interested in picking one up, you can buy the Google Daydream View virtual reality headset from the Google Store for $49. That’s a $30 discount on a headset that normally costs $79. This is the first proper price cut that we’ve seen from Google for this device.

Even though you will save $30 on the head, you will need a Daydream-compatible smartphone to actually use the headset with, and there are only a handful of those available right now including but not limited to the Pixel and Pixel XL as well as the Moto Z series from Motorola. Handsets like the Asus ZenFone AR, ZTE Axon 7, and Huawei Mate 9 Pro will become compatible with Daydream later this year.

Google is offering this discount on all three colors that the Daydream View is available in. This price cut is only for a limited time so you have to buy your unit before February 25th if you want to save $30. It may very well run out of units before then.

Google Daydream View VR Headset Gets First Price Cut , original content from Ubergizmo. Read our Copyrights and terms of use.

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